News

16 Oct

Burundi’s protracted efforts to prevent a UN body mandated to monitor the human rights situation in the country from reporting, were thwarted today by a vote in the General Assembly’s human rights committee.

15 Oct

Everyone should be able to express their opinion freely without any prosecution. China’s upcoming UPR review is a key opportunity for all States to call on China to ensure a safe and enabling environment for defenders and to uphold its human rights obligations.  

12 Oct

Earlier today the General Assembly elected 18 new members to the Human Rights Council, the UN’s top human rights body, for the 2019-2021 term. Not only were countries that blatantly violate the required criteria among those elected, they received a substantial number of votes. 

24 Sep

The world’s top human rights body should only be composed of States who have a genuine commitment to protecting human rights. At the Human Rights Council elections to take place tomorrow in New York, UN Member States should refrain from voting for candidates that blatantly fail to uphold the highest standards of human rights and fail to fully cooperate with this Council.

11 Oct

We all possess the fundamental right to express our views, free from repression or attack. States should use Chad’s upcoming Universal Periodic Review as an opportunity to call on the government to stop the erosion of civil society space, and create a protective legislative framework for human rights defenders. 

ISHR event: The role, protection and effective participation of human rights defenders in development

Join the discussion!

Tuesday, 29 October 2013 1:15 – 2:30 pm (EDT)

 

Watch a live, on-demand webcast of this event at http://webtv.un.org
Follow it on Twitter @ISHRGlobal and and participate in the discussion using #HRDsDev
Or, attend in person at the United Nations in New York, Conference room 1 (Conference Building)
Download the event flyer here

 

What is the role of human rights defenders in identifying, preventing, mitigating and remedying the adverse impacts of large-scale development projects?
What are the responsibilities of States, corporations and multilateral development actors in ensuring that human rights defenders can undertake their work in a safe and enabling environment?

 

Human rights defenders can make a crucial contribution to both promoting social and economic development and to mitigating adverse impacts of development initiatives.  The recent reports of the Special Rapporteur on Human Rights Defenders and the Working Group on Business and Human Rights highlight the worrisome trend of violations, including threats, attacks and harassment, against human rights defenders who work on issues of development and corporate accountability. Defenders working on land rights, including women defenders and those working for the rights of indigenous communities are particularly vulnerable to such violations.

Opening and welcome

  • Tine Mørch Smith – Deputy Permanent Representative of Norway to the UN

Panellists

  • Margaret Sekaggya – UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders
  • Pavel Sulyandziga – Chair of the UN Working Group on the issue of human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises
  • Cristina Hardaga Fernández – Strategic and Political Engagement Coordinator, JASS Mesoameric

Moderator

  • Arvind Ganesan - Director of Business and Human Rights Division, Human Rights Watch

This side event will consider the role of human rights defenders in identifying, preventing, mitigating and remedying the adverse impacts of large-scale development projects. Furthermore, it will discuss the responsibility of States, corporations and multilateral development actors in ensuring that human rights defenders can undertake their work in a safe and enabling environment.

If you do not have a UN pass and would like to attend please RSVP to Madeleine Sinclair, m.sinclair@ishr.ch, by 12:00 pm, Friday October 24.

Date: 
Tuesday, October 29, 2013 - 13:15 to 14:30
Image: 
Event Type: 

China’s human rights record under scrutiny at the UN

22.10.2013

(Geneva) – China’s human rights record was in the spotlight at the UN today as it presented itself for its second assessment under the Universal Periodic Review (UPR).

‘The UPR offers a unique opportunity to assess the human rights record of all UN member States every four and a half years’, said Michael Ineichen, ISHR’s Director of Human Rights Council Advocacy. ‘This time, China had no control over the list of States who spoke, which meant we saw criticisms across the board and from all regions of the world.’

There were some hard-hitting interventions from the 140 States signed up to take part in the review, including calls on China to end arbitrary detention as a means of controlling human rights defenders, to investigate reprisals against those who cooperate with the UN system, and to ratify the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR).

But friendly States were also out in force, with well-wishers such as Gabon, Cuba, Jamaica, and Iran congratulating China on its implementation of recommendations from its last UPR, its commitment to NGO participation in the review, its progress on poverty alleviation, and encouraging it to crack down on ‘illegal’ use of the internet.

Commenting on this Mr Ineichen said, ‘It was evident that China had rallied its friends to its cause, with even small States like Comoros, rare participants in the UPR, taking the floor to support the Chinese line.’

The continued detention of human rights defender Ms Cao Shunli in Beijing’s First Prison overshadowed the review. Ms Shunli has not been seen since 14 September when she tried to board a plane to attend a meeting of the UN’s Human Rights Council in Geneva. She had been attempting to convince the Chinese Government to allow civil society to participate in the UPR process.

‘Cao Shunli’s case is emblematic of the lengths some States will go to to prevent civil society participation in the UN human rights system’, Mr Ineichen said. ‘In that sense it speaks to the power of the system in the eyes of these countries.’

For its part, China repeatedly stated how much it ‘values the participation of NGOs’ in the UPR. It claimed to have solicited the views of ‘dozens’ of organisations, as well as seeking broad public input via the Foreign Ministry’s website. However, it noted, some individuals did not participate through these established channels, but ‘instigated unlawful gatherings’. It expressed regret that ‘criminals’ were being labelled human rights defenders.

Despite the high profile of Cao Shunli’s case, she was not mentioned by name during the review. Finland was one of the few States to attempt to pin China down on the issue of reprisals suffered for attempted cooperation with the UPR. However Hungary, despite leading on a ground-breaking resolution condemning reprisals, at the 24th session of the Human Rights Council, did not question China on this point during the UPR.  

‘While we are disappointed that some States did not show leadership on this issue, we were pleased to see others, such as Ireland, step up’, said Mr Ineichen. Ireland spoke out strongly on civil society space, showing commitment to the principles in the resolution it led on this subject at the Human Rights Council. It called on China to ensure an environment ‘free from fear’. And in another strong statement the US called for the end of legal measures such as enforced disappearance directed at human rights defenders, their families and friends.

‘Unfortunately the few commitments we saw China make in response were very much on its own terms’, said Mr Ineichen. Although China stated its readiness to cooperate with the UN, and issued four invitations to UN experts to visit the country, these invitations are to experts working on health, safe drinking water, the effects of foreign debt, and discrimination against women – a notable absence of those issues raised consistently throughout the review, such as freedom of association and assembly, torture, arbitrary detention, and human rights defenders.

Similarly, China repeated its invitation to the High Commissioner to visit, but made no commitments to giving her unhindered access to all parts of the country including Tibet (officially known as TARC).

And in response to repeated calls from States that China should ratify the ICCPR, China rolled out its standard response, that its policy is not to ratify international instruments until the domestic conditions are right, and that it is taking steps in this direction. It made the same comment at its last UPR and then as now failed to set out a clear timetable for ratification.

‘What we also saw is China's attempt to hold itself accountable to lower standards than other countries’, said Mr Ineichen, as China offered thanks to supportive countries for ‘recognising the challenges’ that a developing country faces in implementing human rights. ‘There can be no excuse for violating human rights’, Mr Ineichen said. ‘China’s record across the board must be viewed in the light of the same universal human rights standards that all States are expected to uphold.’  

Contact Michael Ineichen. Director – UN Human Rights Council Advocacy, International Service for Human Rights, on m.ineichen@ishr.ch or + 41 78 827 77 86.

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Interns are required to adhere to a confidentiality commitment.
Interns agree to keep any and all work-related matters confidential during, as well as after, the period of their internship. Details will be given at the induction training.

If I am accepted, what kind of work will I be doing?

This will depend on the needs of the team to which you are assigned. See the internship webpage for reference.

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ISHR does not fund language courses. There are, however, cheap (or even free) options. A list of these possibilities will be provided to successful applicants.

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Mechanism

1984

ISHR commences work to develop an international Declaration on the Rights of Human Rights Defenders

1988

ISHR publishes first Human Rights Monitor, connecting human rights defenders on the ground with international human rights systems and developments

1993

ISHR facilitates global civil society engagement with the Second World Conference on Human Rights, which leads to the strengthening of women’s rights, the affirmation of universal rights, the adoption of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action and the establishment of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights

1994

ISHR provides training, technical assistance and support to its 1000th human rights defender

1998

After 14 years of ISHR lobbying, advocacy and negotiation, the UN General Assembly adopts the landmark Declaration on Human Rights Defenders

2000

UN Secretary-General appoints Hina Jilani as inaugural UN Special Representative on Human Rights Defenders, strengthening protection of human rights advocates at risk worldwide.

2004

ISHR leads a successful campaign for the appointment of a Special Rapporteur on Human Rights Defenders by the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights

2005

ISHR co-founds and supports a range of international and regional human rights coalitions, including the Women Human Rights Defenders International Coalition, the East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Project and the West African Human Rights Defenders Network

2006

ISHR contributes to the establishment and institution building of a new global peak body for human rights issues, the UN Human Rights Council

2007

ISHR leads and coordinates the development of the Yogyakarta Principles on sexual orientation and gender identity, strengthening legal recognition and protection of LGBT rights worldwide

2011

ISHR’s sustained advocacy on the issue of reprisals and intimidation faced by human rights defenders leads to adoption of landmark UN Human Rights Council resolution condemning and strengthening protections against reprisals

2012

Working with key NGO partners such as Amnesty International, ISHR leads civil society efforts to strengthen UN human rights treaty bodies, prevent their weakening and better connect their work with victims and human rights defenders on the ground

2013

Working with supportive states and NGOs, ISHR advocacy leads to adoption of historic Human Rights Council resolution calling on all States to review and amend national laws to respect and protect the work of human rights defenders