News

24 Jul

Following a request by ISHR and ACAT France, the UN Committee against Torture (CAT) is urging Morocco to end reprisals against a leading Sahrawi human rights defender who submitted a complaint to the CAT.

08 Jul
Photo of participants of HRDAP18

We look back at all that the 14 dedicated human rights defenders participating in our 2018 Human Rights Defenders Advocacy Programme (HRDAP) achieved during their packed time in Geneva.

06 Jul

ISHR has published a ‘scorecard’ for Iceland that is seeking election to the UN Human Rights Council for 2018-2019.

09 Jul

In high-level dialogues around the third anniversary of China’s ‘July 9 Crackdown’, the European Union must press the Chinese government for the release of detained activists, say human rights groups. 

06 Jul

Civil society groups welcomed significant outcomes of the Human Rights Council's 38th session, including the adoption of resolutions protecting civil society space and peaceful protests. Another success worth mentioning is the adoption of resolutions protecting women and girls from violence,  in addition to Council action on a number of countries such as Eritrea, Belarus, Syria and the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

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HRC38 | NGOs call on States to fulfill their duty to protect LGBTI defenders

13.06.2018

Everyone has the right to defend human rights and fundamental freedoms. However, in the current climate, those defending human rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) persons, not only suffer risks common to all defenders, but they are also stigmatised, lack recognition and support from civil society, are arbitrarily arrested and detained, and even killed.

The joint submission by 12 NGOs to the Independent Expert on violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, made in the leadup to the presentation of his report to the upcoming session of the Human Rights Council, details State obligations based in existing international human rights law that have been articulated in the Yogyakarta Principles and Yogyakarta Principles plus 10. These obligations, if implemented, would work towards ensuring that LGBTI defenders’ rights are protected.

‘LGBTI rights defenders are targeted by States, non-State actors, members of their own community, and even other defenders because of their identity and work. It is essential that States ensure this group of vulnerable defenders are protected,’ says ISHR’s Tess McEvoy.

The submission calls for States to protect LGBTI defenders by fulfilling their duties, including to:

  • Take appropriate measures to eradicate all forms of violence, discrimination, and other harm on grounds of sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, and sex characteristics (SOGIESC);
  • Exercise due diligence to prevent, investigate, prosecute, punish, and provide remedies for discrimination, violence, and other harm on the basis of SOGIESC, whether committed by State or non-State actors;
  • Ensure access to effective complaints procedures and remedies, including reparation, for victims of violence, discrimination, and other harm on grounds of SOGIESC; and
  • Enact a law to establish, designate, or maintain an adequately resourced mechanism for the protection of LGBTI rights defenders.

Critically, the joint written submission calls on the Independent Expert to:

  1. Use the authoritative interpretations in the YPs and the YPs plus 10 in engagement with States on issues relating to LGBTI defenders; and
  2. Engage with other relevant Special Procedures mandate holders and LGBTI rights defenders to identify protection needs of these individuals and organisations.

Contact: Tess McEvoy, t.mcevoy@ishr.ch.

Photo: Flickr_Danilo Urbina 

NGO Access | According space to civil society is not optional, says UN High Commissioner

11.06.2018

In a new report on civil society engagement at the UN, the High Commissioner for Human Rights concludes that the effective functioning of international and regional organisations is inextricably linked to civil society participation. Concurrently, he highlights that human rights defenders and NGOs continue to face a vast array of restrictions and risk being targets of reprisals when seeking to engage with the UN. The report reflected various restrictions on civil society, as well as recommendations to improve civil society participation, set out by in ISHR in its submission to the report.

Restrictions faced

The High Commissioner acknowledged that numerous obstacles to the full and effective participation of civil society remain. For many defenders, restriction begins long before they reach UN grounds. At the 61st session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women, women human rights defenders were denied visas and security clearances to enter the US. The exclusion of women human rights defenders recurred this year in the 62nd session to a higher degree.

‘Civil society’s right to communicate with intergovernmental organisations is well established’, says ISHR’s Eleanor Openshaw. ‘It is unacceptable that civil society voices continue to be restricted, and even silenced, in many UN spaces.’

Referring to the Secretary-General’s annual report on reprisals, the High Commissioner listed a range of reprisals experienced by those engaging with the UN, including travel bans, financial persecution, surveillance, smear campaigns, unlawful arrests and detention, torture, and sexual assault, among other abuses.  

The High Commissioner is clear about the adverse impact of reprisals against individuals seeking to cooperate or cooperating with the UN.  He notes that they both generally constitute individual human rights violations but also risk undermining the effectiveness of the system as a whole.

ISHR welcomes his recommendation to ‘ensure the safety and security of persons seeking to engage with regional and international organisations, including online, prevent any acts of reprisals by State or non-State actors against them and, when such reprisals do occur, condemn them and ensure accountability and access to an effective remedy ‘.

ISHR’s Tess McEvoy says that the UN needs to take more concrete action on intimidation and reprisal. 'There needs to be a unified and comprehensive response to these cases', she adds. 'All States need to take action against cases of reprisal no matter where they occur.’

Proposed reform

Though dire in its description of restrictions at the UN, the report does propose some institutional reforms to deepen civil society participation in UN bodies, such as NGO advisory boards or liaisons, accountability mechanisms to address restrictions, and expanded remote participation.

The High Commissioner also emphasises the need to diversify civil society participation by reaching out to groups including women, children, young people, older persons, persons with disabilities, ethnic, national, linguistic and racial minorities, migrants and indigenous peoples.  

The report specifically points to the NGO Committee - notorious for its politicised practice - as an area for reform, including reviewing the practice and procedures of the NGO Committee to ensure it complies with international standards such as non-discrimination, accountability and transparency.

‘The High Commissioner’s conclusion about the effectiveness of the system riding on civil society engagement is significant’, said McEvoy, ‘It speaks to the essential role civil society plays in holding States to account and contributing to UN debates, but also in striving for a system fit for the purpose of fulfilling the aims of the UN Charter.’ 

‘We call on UN bodies and mechanisms, as well as States, to ensure recommendations in this report become reality,' McEvoy concluded.  

Contact: Tess McEvoy, t.mcevoy@ishr.ch.

Photo: flickr_us_mission_in_geneva.

UAE UPR submission

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Opinion:

By Nicolas Agostini, Representative to the United Nations, DefendDefenders 

The world’s top human rights body needs members with a genuine commitment to protecting human rights. Electing States should ensure that candidates with a record of systematically violating rights and failing to cooperate with the Council receive no support in the ballot.

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Mechanism

1984

ISHR commences work to develop an international Declaration on the Rights of Human Rights Defenders

1988

ISHR publishes first Human Rights Monitor, connecting human rights defenders on the ground with international human rights systems and developments

1993

ISHR facilitates global civil society engagement with the Second World Conference on Human Rights, which leads to the strengthening of women’s rights, the affirmation of universal rights, the adoption of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action and the establishment of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights

1994

ISHR provides training, technical assistance and support to its 1000th human rights defender

1998

After 14 years of ISHR lobbying, advocacy and negotiation, the UN General Assembly adopts the landmark Declaration on Human Rights Defenders

2000

UN Secretary-General appoints Hina Jilani as inaugural UN Special Representative on Human Rights Defenders, strengthening protection of human rights advocates at risk worldwide.

2004

ISHR leads a successful campaign for the appointment of a Special Rapporteur on Human Rights Defenders by the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights

2005

ISHR co-founds and supports a range of international and regional human rights coalitions, including the Women Human Rights Defenders International Coalition, the East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Project and the West African Human Rights Defenders Network

2006

ISHR contributes to the establishment and institution building of a new global peak body for human rights issues, the UN Human Rights Council

2007

ISHR leads and coordinates the development of the Yogyakarta Principles on sexual orientation and gender identity, strengthening legal recognition and protection of LGBT rights worldwide

2011

ISHR’s sustained advocacy on the issue of reprisals and intimidation faced by human rights defenders leads to adoption of landmark UN Human Rights Council resolution condemning and strengthening protections against reprisals

2012

Working with key NGO partners such as Amnesty International, ISHR leads civil society efforts to strengthen UN human rights treaty bodies, prevent their weakening and better connect their work with victims and human rights defenders on the ground

2013

Working with supportive states and NGOs, ISHR advocacy leads to adoption of historic Human Rights Council resolution calling on all States to review and amend national laws to respect and protect the work of human rights defenders